Cyber Spending Database

Cyber Spending Database

In the first half of 2017 alone, we’ve seen:

• NSA hacking tools leaked by the Shadow Brokers, who have started posting stolen data online

• WannaCry temporarily cripple the UK’s National Health Service, hit FedEx and infect computers in 150 countries

• Hackers dump a 9GB trove of emails two days before the French elections

• Although not a hack, 198 million voter records in the US breached and exposed due to “misconfiguration.”

How much and where is the US government spending money on cyber programs?

It’s a good question to ask at a time when everyone needs, and pays, for cyber security.

Taxpayers for Common Sense has created a comprehensive Cyber Spending database to show how much money the federal government is spending on cyber programs across all agencies – which, in addition to being complex and dynamic, are inherently at risk today, in the age of the hack.

It’s especially important to ask where the taxpayer’s money is going. Until now, there hasn’t been an easy way to track this information. Furthermore, the fragmented nature of cyber security programs means there is no central authority for tracking amounts or efficiencies of spending. Unlike most other types of government spending — except intelligence and, perhaps, homeland security – cyber spending isn’t easily tracked or fully documented.

Bottom line: We, the taxpayers, don’t really know where the federal government is spending cyber dollars, how they are being spent, why, or when. So how are we to know what’s working, duplicative, or inefficient? Because as Taxpayers president Ryan Alexander points out, “You need to name things in order to better manage them.”

Click here to access the Taxpayers for Common Sense CyberSpending database.